The Escape Game – Pigeon Forge

 

If you like to do puzzles and are up for a challenge I would highly recomThe Escape Game - Pigeon Forge, TN, United Statesmend this game.  Groups all work together to figure out the clues.  The staff is very friendly and helpful.  Don’t be afraid to ask them questions during the game too.  You may be paired with other groups if you have a small group.  Make your reservations in advanced and early.  If you don’t want to be with a lot of other people, perhaps doing an early escape room would work.

There are times you have to think out of the box.  Don’t be shy, every recommendation should be considered.  Leave no rock unturned.

The Island in Pigeon Forge

http://theescapegamepigeonforge.com/

112 Reagan Drive, Gatlinburg, TN 37738

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Minister’s Tree House

the-ministers-treehouse-crossville-tn-1Long live the world’s largest treehouse!

As Minister Horace Burgess tells the story, in 1993, the Minister was praying when God told him, “If you build a tree house, I’ll see that you never run out of material.” Inspired by this vision, the quiet Minister set out to build the largest treehouse in the world.

For fourteen years, Minister Burgess has been adding to the tree house, spending $12,000 to build it. Over that time, the treehouse has grown to truly monumental proportions, and the Minister may have already achieved his goal of building the world’s largest treehouse. Currently, his treehouse has five stories containing 80 rooms, and is complete with a church and a bell tower. The bell tower at the top of the treehouse is equipped with oxygen acetylene bottles that, repurposed as bells, chime daily.  Without blueprints, this unique church resembles an epic tree house pinned up by cross boards and nails.  Random wood boards add quirky flair to the architecture, adding random patterns to the disarray of the design.  Multiple levels of corridors and rooms make up the inside of the tree house. It all comes together to form an impressive construct reminiscent of something from a fairy tail book.

This 97-foot-tall tree house and church is supported by a still-living 80-foot-tall white oak tree with a 12-foot diameter base,  and relies on six other oak trees for support.  In southern style, every story of the treehouse is surrounded by a porch deck. There are no “Private Property,” or “No Climbing” signs posted around, Burgess say the treehouse is God’s house and everyone is welcome. From the top of the treehouse the word “Jesus” can be seen spelled out in flora in a nearby field. As of 2012 the treehouse has been temporarily closed by a local Fire Marshall.  Therefore, you can not climb up into the tree house, but you can still view it from the outside.

The place is getting a little old, but it’s free for everyone to come and enjoy. It’s great for kids young and old!  It is about 2 1/2 hours from the Sevierville area.

Courtesee:  Atlas Obscura

Address:  Beehive Lane, Crossville, TN 38571

Website:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/chucksutherland/3977773445/

I-40 exit 320. Turn north onto Hwy 298, then make an immediate right at the stoplight onto Cook Rd. Drive almost a mile. As the road takes a sharp right, instead make a sharp left onto Beehive Lane. Drive about a half-mile. The pavement will end, but keep driving. You’ll see the tree house ahead and to the right. Remember that when you visit, you will be trespassing, and that the treehouse is not a funhouse. There are no safety precautions. You visit at your own risk.

Greenbrier Road Auto Tour

This route follows the Little Pigeon River to Trillium Gap. No trucks, trailers or RVs are allowed. The roadCascades in Greenbrier Section leads to the John Messer Barn and the trailhead to Ramsay Cascades, arguably the best waterfall in the Park. The hike is 8 miles roundtrip and is challenging. A lesser visited area of the Park, the Greenbrier section is one of our favorites. Besides the Ramsay Cascades, the visitor has the opportunity to view large stands of virgin growth such as northern red oak, eastern hemlock, and red maple. In fact, the Great Smoky Mountains are home to 21 champion-size trees. When the Park was created in 1934, old-growth forests were saved from the lumber companies and preserved for Smokies visitors. To get to Greenbrier Road, leave Gatlinburg at light #3 and head east on Hwy 321. Travel for approximately 7 miles and turn right on Greenbrier Road. If you include the hike to Ramsay Cascades, expect this tour to take upwards of 5 hours.

You can easily leave the road and walk down to the river and walk on the large bolders to get right in the middle of the river and little waterfalls.  There are a lot of areas to swim in or just sit on a rock and enjoy the beauty of nature at its best it is so very relaxing. There is also some great hiking trails.  The Porters Creek Trail is one of the best known trails for spring wildflowers. There are often lots of butterflies and many varieties of birds to enjoy.   You will find creeks, some historical areas and a small picnic area.   If you come ot the Smokies for peace and quiet, they can often be found at Greenbrier.

Address – 3635 Taliluna Ave., Unit 1 B, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, TN 37919

Weddings in the Great Smoky Mountains

Little log wedding chapel

The Smoky Mountains of East Tennessee are a top destination in the country for weddings due to the gorgeous scenery of Sevierville, Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg. Peaks and valleys provide breathtaking views that mirror the promise of lifelong wedded bliss.

Every year, over 10,000 brides plan Sevierville, Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg weddings in and around the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The Smokies are considered “The wedding capital of the South,” and Sevier County offers everything you’ll want and need for your special Smoky Mountain wedding, including beautiful wedding chapels, local florists, bakers, salons, spas, catering services, photography, entertainment and much more. Local ministers will be happy to come to your cabin, condo or chalet to perform intimate Smoky Mountain weddings.

Whether you prefer a cabin, chapel or scenic outdoor wedding, Smoky Mountain wedding venues and packages are sure to please brides, grooms and wedding guests alike.

Getting married in the National Park: Persons planning to be married in the park need to obtain a Special Use Permit (SUP). A $50 nonrefundable application fee will be charged for wedding permits and all other special event-type permits.

For more information and to obtain an application package, contact the permit office at 865-436-1266.

More information  http://www.smokeymountainwedding.org/w_outdoor.htm

Chapels near the cabin http://www.logchapel.com/?page/80511/home  http://www.discoverachurchinthesmokies.com/OFB/seviervi/mcum.htm http://www.thebarnatchestnutsprings.com/index2.php?v=v1#!/Home

http://smokymountainweddingconnection.com

http://www.flowermountainwedding.com/aboutus/

This Inn is only 3 minutes from our cabin “Smoky Mountain Splendor”.  http://www.bluffmountaininn.com/index.html

Ogle log cabin

IM000925.JPGGatlinburg, Tennessee is a place which boasts a very rich history. Of course, all the attractions and shops lining the Gatlinburg Parkway are fun, but behind all the touristy stuff lies quite a few historic sites you can visit to experience the essence of what makes our quaint Smoky Mountain town so special.

In about 1802, William Ogle laid claim on what was to be the site of the first home in Gatlinburg, then called White Oak Flats. He cut and hewed the logs for the cabin and returned home to South Carolina to get his family, telling them they were moving to the “Land of Paradise.”    William Ogle came down with malaria and died in 1803, before he could bring his family to his newly-discovered paradise.  His wife, though, followed through on his plans — four years after his death, she gathered the family and they traveled to White Oak Flats, found William’s hewed logs, and finished the cabin.  She raised 7 or 8 children in that little home.  It’s humbling to go through and think about the lives of people during this time. http://www.gatlinburg.com/things-to-do/culture-history/

The Ogles modern day descendants own most of the land around Gatlinburg. The business you see are mostly long term ground leases, not Fee Simple ownership of the land.

The nature trail behind the house is very beautiful and peaceful (the trail head says easy, but is rocky).   The streams and creeks are very relaxing to hear.

Address – Corner of Parkway & Cherokee Orchard Road, Gatlinburg, TN  Directions-to-Ogle-Cabin

We had a hard time finding this cabin.  It is right at traffic light number 6.  This is a big intersection where the Aquarium and the bar Draft’s is.  If you take the trolley and get off at the Ripley’s Aquarium, you will see a gift shop across the intersection.  To the right of the gift shop there is the cabin hidden by some trees.  We did not see a trail.

Chattanooga attractions

Ruby FallsLookout Mountain is a high, wide plateau located on top of a mountain and surrounded by perpendicular cliffs Lookout Mountain is home to three exciting attractions: Incline Railway, Ruby Falls (500+ ft underground tall waterfall) and Rock City (above ground water fall) .  Chattanooga is about 3 hours from our cabin.  But sounds like a great day trip.    You can also visit the Incline Railway.  http://www.lookoutmountain.com/  These are privately owned and not affected by the Government shutdown.

Scenery is outstanding and a neat drive to get there.  Civil War Enthusiasts will love to hear about the Battle of Chattanooga.  http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/chattanooga.html at Point Park.  This is a National Park.  Great Civil War history and exhibits. Good history of Civil War battles that were fought in the Chattanooga area.  The hike takes you walking through giant rocks, climbing stairs,  uphill and downhill.  Be sure to wear comfortable shoes and leave about 2-3 hours for this unique attraction.

Sunset RockIf you enjoy watching rock climbers, you can head on over to Sunset Rock.  Sunset Rock is a lesser known and utilized climbing area in the southeast, perched atop lookout mountain and offering spectacular views of the Chattanooga Valley and Raccoon Mountain in southeastern Tennessee.  It consists of sandstone similar to that of neighboring Tennessee Wall, but its western orientation and higher altitude help make it considerably more attractive in the summer and during hot periods.

Raccoon Mountain Caverns is Tennessee’s highest rated cave and is located just outside of Chattanooga, Tennessee.  tour the vast cave system, pan for gemstones, enjoy the thrill of a go-kart ride, or relax by a camp fire while taking in the spectacular views of both Lookout Mountain and Raccoon Mountain.