Bluff Mountain Adventures ATV Rides

ATV rideATV Mountain Biking is probably something that you don’t normally do. Why not do it in the Smoky Mountains.  You may also choose to ride the Rhino if you don’t want to ride alone. There is also something called a side by side.

There are 6,000 acres of privately owned land with endless, challenging trails spread throughout. You will ride very nice ATVs over an array of challenging and fun terrain. You will go up hills so steep an ATV can’t make it up unless it’s in 4-wheel drive. You get to ride over very rough rocky patches, through creeks, through deep puddles. The lookouts give you an unbelievable view.

There are several rides to choose from.  Make sure you take the mountain View ride (1 1/2 hour – 2 overlooks) if you want to see some great views.  Ask at the check in about your options.  You will need to call for times.  Go on a clear day.  You will be stopping and taking pictures as well as riding through the wooded terrain.

You must be 16 to ride the ATVs unless you take the one hour tour (which doesn’t go to the overlooks).  The ride never goes over 15-20 MPH.  Most of the ride is about 10MPH.  So, may not be for the more experienced driver.  The guides are great and will help you with your equipment, safety, training, etc..

Don’t forget to wear closed toed shoes.  A scull rag or handkerchief might be nice to put under the helmets they give you. Also wear some old clothes.  Your clothes may get muddy.  You may want to put your camera and cell phone in a plastic bag.  There is a height requirement.  Go early in the morning or you may have to wait.  You may want to bring a bottle of water.

Website:  http://bluffmountainadventures.com/

Address to ticket office:  2186 Parkway, Pigeon Forge, TN 37863

Phone:  865-428-7711

Billboards interview with Dolly

Dollyfancom

dolly-parton-bb36-03-2014-billboard-400
Photo by Joe Pugliese

I’ve read one of the most great interviews with Dolly yesterday.It was this one from Billboards Q & A
It is has create alot of reactions just because…I really don’t know…What’s wrong to love every humans? After all we are only humans anyway.
Here I’ve picked some of my best of the interview…

How are you different now from the girl who came to Nashville in 1964?

I’m more successful now than I was then, but I still feel like the same girl. I’m just a working girl. I never think of myself as a star because, as somebody once said, “A star is nothing but a big ball of gas” — and I don’t want to be that.

Dollywood attracts lots of church groups, but it has also become a draw for the LGBT community. What does that say about you?

It’s a place for…

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Place of a Thousand Drips, Tennessee

The Waterfall Record

Just outside of Gaitlinburg, Tennessee, you can easily enter Great Smoky Mountain National Park and take a drive along the one-way Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail. It’s a fascinating drive, and there are a number of waterfalls that can be accessed from the motor trail. Some of them require medium length hikes to view the falls, and on the day I was there, there was moderately consistent thunder, so I decided against those hikes.

There are a few waterfalls that can be easily viewed from the trail, though. One of them is unnamed, and is discussed here. The other, better advertised waterfall, is the Place of a Thousand Drips, which happens to be an amazingly cool name for a waterfall. I would assume it gets its name from the way it seems to split into many different drops, recombine, split again, and so on. It’s a rather fascinating view.

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Logging…Loving…Leaving…Life The Story Of Elkmont

cluffcabins

There has been much controversy concerning the Great Smoky Mountains National Park from the idea of it’s inception.  The area now know as Elkmont within the park is no exception.  The area started as a logging camp around 1901 when Colonel Townsend founded the Little River Railroad and the Little River Lumber Co.

As logging began to make the area more accesible the tourism trade grew. Townsend sold some of the land to outdoor and hunting enthusiast who soon began to build summer cottages. The former logging camps of Elkmont and Tremont were turned into vacation destinations which led to the creation of the Wonderland Hotel and the Appalachian Club.

By the 1920’s many people began to notice how the logging operations had devestated the land and the push for a national park began.  The problem with the national park idea was that the land was owned by private…

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